9 December 2011

Pork - Naga Estyle

With the days speeding towards Christmas, this Naga belle, yours truly, is craving for many a dish that is typically Rongmei Naga. I miss the sight and smell of home and especially the home grown spices and ingredients. December truly is a celebration month back at home. The month is always packed with weddings, families get-together, love feasts at Church ect..etc..and the main dish that dominate the menu in most of such occasion is Pork or Beef or both (quite predictably) :D. Fish and Chicken are like a side dish, or made specially for those with health issues...basically for the Unwell lot ;).


Yes...fact is Naga people in general love pork and we love it most when cooked with fermented bamboo shoot or with fermented soya beans (the typical way). The way we process soya bean is totally different from that of the the Chinese. The smell is overwhelming but the taste is (for us) just mind blowing. Fermented bamboo shoot and soya beans are lovingly parceled by mothers to their children who are far away from home. Both these ingredients are used in curries and chutneys as well. 

Today's recipe is one of the Naga style of cooking that i love. Pork is cooked with dried soya beans, with potatoes as the thickening agent. Typically you would use raja mirchi instead of the green chilli and red chilli powder, fresh turmeric instead of the powder. Also due to the non availability of other local spices, i have used garam masala, an obvious influence of being married to a mainland Indian ;).

Sun-dried Soya beans
Ingredients:
1 Kilo - Pork, cubed
3 - Medium Onions, diced
4 - Medium sized new potatoes
7 Tbsp - Veg' Oil
1/2 Cup - Dried Soya Beans
3 - Green Chillies, slit in the middle
3-4 - Garlic Pods, smashed
1 - Thumb sized Ginger smashed and diced
1 Tsp - Garam Masala (optional)
1 Tsp - Tumeric Powder
2-3 Tsp - Red Chilli Powder
Salt - According to taste
4 1/2 Cups - Water

Method:
  1. Heat some water in the microwave for about 1 minute plus and soak the soya beans
  2. Divide the pork meat into two batches, heat about 2 Tbsp oil in a pan and brown the first batch
  3. Repeat with the second batch with 2 Tbsp of oil and keep aside
  4. In the same pan, add the rest of the oil, when it is hot, add garlic and fry till it becomes fragrant
  5. Now add the ginger, saute for a minute and then add the diced onions and the slit green chillies and saute till the onion is evenly browned
  6. Now add the browned meat, sprinkle salt and mix it up well,put the lid on and cook on medium high flame for some time
  7. Once the steam starts coming off the lid, add the rest of the ingredients except water and give it another good stir
  8. Now add the soaked Soya beans and give it a good mixing so that the meat is well coated
  9. Add water and cook with the lid on for about 1 1/2 hours or till the meat is soft to your liking.
  10. Remember to keep stirring it every 2 - 3 minutes.

I personally feel that curries taste best when it is slow cooked. The total prep and cooking time would be around 2 to 21/2 hours depending on how soft you want the meat to be. Serve it over hot rice, raja mirchi chutney and some crunchy salad and you are on your way to becoming a Naga warrior..lol :).

24 comments:

  1. Loved this curry... never heard of this combination..:)
    Thanks for sharing dear..:))
    Can we substitute chicken or lamb instead of pork?
    Glad to have browsed around and it feels nice to be connected..:))
    Would love to see you in my blog..:))
    Reva

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for joining Reva:). This recipe can be adapted for Chicken and Beef but not lamb :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi
      Growing up in Nagaland has made me an ardent fan of Naga cuisine as any of the Naga people who live in Mainland now for many reasons:) I have taken the trouble to actually go and hunt bamboo shoot from one tiny shop in Pune as everywhere else, it was not available. Your recipes would definitely help me recreate themagic I savored as a child:) Thanks so much...I had many Rongmei friends too!

      Delete
    2. Hi Soheli, I am so glad you stopped by. Delighted to hear of your love for Naga food. Hope your dish turn out amazing! Keep coming back for more :D.

      Cheers!!

      Delete
  3. This is my fav. thanks for the post. I like this dish even before I was born.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Geeta, Yes you can substitute the soy bean with other dried beans variety like dried lima beans or butter beans; it goes really well with pork. Hope this helps! Do come back for more :0.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Fermented beans; my new hunt in Delhi. Will post results here.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Fermented beans! Now where do I find them in Delhi?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can get them at asha store in safdarjung near ncc gate

      Delete
    2. You can find those in Kishangarh, vasant kunj, in all the Northeastern stores.
      Ben

      Delete
  7. Hi Rahul, I'm sorry, i am not sure where i can direct you. Would it help for you to inquire any North-East friend over there? Better still, ask for some from their coffer? :) I'm wondering if the Naga food stall in Dilli-Haat might help? Wish you all the luck!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hi, good work on the blog. Tribal food, especially delicious Naga recipes, need to be documented. For millennials like me who live far away, who don't have Naga relatives around to ask for recipes and prefer the convenience of the internet, this is a godsend. If I want the authentic Naga style recipe without the turmeric and garam masala, what do I need to add? Let me know. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi There! Thanks for stopping by. To go authentic, you can just avoid the garam masala. Although, is there any particular reason you want to avoid the turmeric? If you don't like the powder, you can go for fresh turmeric maybe? Turmeric not only adds flavour and gives colour to the dish, it also has many health benefits. Also, we do use turmeric in our traditional style of cooking -- if you need more information or help, you can e-mail me at pancuisine@rocketmail.com. Hope your curry turn out great!

      Delete
  9. I found fermented soya beans in Dilli Haat. Not sure if there's a Naga stall there at the moment, as the focus was on tribal cultures when I was there, but the Naga cafe is permanent. Now I have them here in the UK so am looking at how to cook them. .

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hello Nick, Hope this recipe came in handy! Thanks for stopping by, and let me know if you need any further help cooking it. Have a blessed New Year!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi...I am Colonel S Philip, I have served in Nagaland and truly respect the people,cuisine and culture. I love to cook and the naga style has forced me to revisit my concept of cooking as regards a few veggies and meat. The simplicity of a chicken dish slowly simered with just the simplest ingredients like bamboo shoot(baans tenga),lightly pounded ginger n garlic,pounded raw turmeric, crushed bhoot jolokia, n Lai patta in the end with a few potato cubes is amazing. Have experimented with pork but could not find akhuni anywhere in tinsukia..dibrugarh(present posting). could you teach me how to make the akhuni dried n the paste. Just stumbled on the blog...will browse more for your recipes. I can share a lot of barbecue recipes wid you and anything on mutton. Great job n God bless..philip

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Colonel Philip, for stopping by. Appreciate your positive comments! It's always great to come across someone who appreciates North-eastern food. That said, i'm sorry you're unable to find akhuni in your area. Could you drop me a mail at pancuisine@rocketmail.com -- i'll see if i can get hold of a recipe to make akhuni from friends. I must confess i haven't made it from scratch myself :). And yes, i would love to try some of your barbecue recipes, too. Blessings!

      Delete
  12. Lotha pork small pieces with black beans. chutney type. I had this wonderful dish in a food fest in Delhi, but that was the first time and wondering how to have that for the second time. Any one with the recipe will be adored.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello, Biker! By black beans, i'm guessing you're talking about fermented soy beans? This recipe is one of the many ways of cooking pork with soy beans. :D

      Delete
  13. Absolutely delightful recipe. Added some vinegar too

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad you enjoyed this recipe. And i agree, pork and vinegar makes for a good marriage of flavors :).

      Delete
  14. Replies
    1. I hope you try it out, Deryl! Cheers!

      Delete

Thank you for stopping by. Delighted to be sharing some l-o-v-e from my kitchen with you. If you sample any of my cooking, do come back and let me know. Cheers!